Shades Of Sepia

Photographic art & community shared thru photography.

Pinhole Photography

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As I’ve said before, my blog is not meant to be a technical site, and unfortunately pinhole photography is kind of a huge subject. So I’ll just make this REALLY quick and simple. Pinhole photography is a whole separate genre on to itself. It is another type of photographic art that in my opinion is an acquired taste. Then again, it depends on what your doing, and the type of pinhole photographs your trying to create. The short story is, the difference between regular photography and pinhole photography is in essence, one uses a lens, and the other does not. Back in the days, people used to make their own home made pinhole cameras, and created some very interesting photographs. But by today’s standards, most people are not interested in doing pinhole. Part of the reason is, today every photographer wants to do HDR images, overly processed images, or really sharp photos; however, pinhole photographs is often NOT sharp, because you’re not using a lens. When people made their own home made pinhole cameras, even holes with the circumference of some safety pins might have still resulted in a blurry picture. You see, because you’re not using a lens there is no focusing mechanism; so, you’re totally relying on you’re ability to make the smallest hole possible, to get that focus you want. In today’s digital world, there are a couple of companies that make special adapters for your camera such as the one above. Unfortunately, even the $20 pinhole caps aren’t worth spending in my opinion, I think even this Holga kit with all the works is too much money. Your better off getting one of these “Do It Yourself” toy kits like this one, and get much better quality pictures from 35mm film. Either that, find if there still exist a camera shop that can convert your old camera in to a pinhole camera.

Like lomography, I think it’s ridiculous that some of these manufactures are charging so much money for their accessories and conversion adapters, and give really bad quality. Don’t get me wrong, a good majority of pinhole art are not “sharply focused,” perhaps not meant to be in most cases. However, the quality should be good enough that the subject be recognizable. Fans of my blog already know that I prefer to put as much in my camera as possible, and do less on the computer as possible. However, this is one case were I think there are so many of these “pinhole wanna be adapters” for digital cameras are so poor, it’s best to artificially reproduce them on our computers. Save your money that’s my opinion; cause the only other ones that are worth it, are too expensive for the average hobbyist.

© ShadesOfSepia.com

“Straight From Camera:” People

Straight from camera, simply means I’ve done all the processing on the *.jpg file “in camera” without any additional processing using PC software. The nice thing about processing “in camera” is that not only is the bulk of the hard work done in camera, the picture is captured in real-time. So in other words, without processing in camera, you would have to try and figure out how the photograph would have looked like and then try to process it after the fact on your computer (in addition to sometimes shadows and overcasts).. Now, in camera processing doesn’t necessarily mean using my camera’s fancy features (because quite frankly, there are a number of them I can live without). Sometimes it’s as simple as taking my CPL lens off to capture the warmth of the sun, or maybe replacing my lens with something home made. The nice thing about shooting in RAW+jpg, is that if you don’t like how the processed *.jpg came out, or you want to do something different, you have a copy of the pure unprocessed file. I almost forgot to mention that there are some exceptions to this rule. Nikon has an “in camera” HDR feature that does NOT allow you to be in RAW+jpg mode, it absolutely will not work. You must only have your camera in *.jpg mode. Understandable, because the memory that would be required would increase the cost of the camera substantially, not too mention slow processing time. Also keep in mind, that the HDR feature (for at least their entry level cameras) are fake (not real HDR. No three files are produced it processes everything in to one file in camera. However, my opinion is, you’ll have much more control and versatility, if you do HDR on your computer instead. Not sure if this is true for all DSLR cameras, but I recon so, I can’t see too many professionals using this feature. It better to use adobe/Paintshop for these kinds of stuff.

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  • Aperture: ƒ/9
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 12 July, 2014
  • Exposure bias: +1EV
  • Flash fired: yes
  • Focal length: 92mm
  • ISO: 1000
  • Shutter speed: 1/5s

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  • Aperture: ƒ/9
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 12 July, 2014
  • Exposure bias: +1EV
  • Flash fired: yes
  • Focal length: 55mm
  • ISO: 1000
  • Shutter speed: 1/5s

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  • Aperture: ƒ/9
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 12 July, 2014
  • Exposure bias: +1EV
  • Flash fired: yes
  • Focal length: 55mm
  • ISO: 1000
  • Shutter speed: 1/4s

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  • Aperture: ƒ/9
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 12 July, 2014
  • Exposure bias: +1EV
  • Flash fired: yes
  • Focal length: 130mm
  • ISO: 1000
  • Shutter speed: 1/4s

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  • Aperture: ƒ/11
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 12 July, 2014
  • Flash fired: yes
  • Focal length: 135mm
  • ISO: 1000
  • Shutter speed: 1/2s

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  • Aperture: ƒ/8
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 12 July, 2014
  • Flash fired: yes
  • Focal length: 140mm
  • ISO: 1000
  • Shutter speed: 1/8s

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  • Aperture: ƒ/16
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 12 July, 2014
  • Focal length: 220mm
  • ISO: 1000
  • Shutter speed: 1/5s

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  • Aperture: ƒ/25
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 12 July, 2014
  • Focal length: 110mm
  • ISO: 1000
  • Shutter speed: 1/13s

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  • Aperture: ƒ/25
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 12 July, 2014
  • Focal length: 110mm
  • ISO: 1000
  • Shutter speed: 1/13s

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  • Aperture: ƒ/20
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 12 July, 2014
  • Focal length: 102mm
  • ISO: 1000
  • Shutter speed: 1/40s

Other: People

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  • Aperture: ƒ/5.6
  • Credit: ShadesOfSepia.com
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 22 June, 2014
  • Focal length: 300mm
  • ISO: 1250
  • Shutter speed: 1/4000s
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I found this shot to be absolutely hilarious! Only because I could not read the expression on his face! I couldn’t tell whether it was a face that said “damn its hot outside,” or “please help me, this woman is driving me nuts.” LOL

  • Aperture: ƒ/8
  • Credit: ShadesOfSepia.com
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 22 June, 2014
  • Focal length: 55mm
  • ISO: 1000
  • Shutter speed: 1/500s

Black: Objects & Thāngs

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  • Aperture: ƒ/2.2
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 26 July, 2014
  • Focal length: 35mm
  • ISO: 400
  • Shutter speed: 1/4000s

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  • Aperture: ƒ/8
  • Credit: ShadesOfSepia.com
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 22 June, 2014
  • Focal length: 62mm
  • ISO: 500
  • Shutter speed: 1/2000s

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  • Aperture: ƒ/8
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 8 June, 2014
  • Flash fired: yes
  • Focal length: 135mm
  • ISO: 800
  • Shutter speed: 1/200s

Black: Infrared: Sports

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  • Aperture: ƒ/5.6
  • Credit: ShadesOfSepia.com
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 22 June, 2014
  • Focal length: 300mm
  • ISO: 1250
  • Shutter speed: 1/1600s

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  • Aperture: ƒ/5.6
  • Credit: ShadesOfSepia.com
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 22 June, 2014
  • Focal length: 300mm
  • ISO: 1250
  • Shutter speed: 1/1600s

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  • Aperture: ƒ/5.6
  • Credit: ShadesOfSepia.com
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 22 June, 2014
  • Focal length: 300mm
  • ISO: 1250
  • Shutter speed: 1/1600s

Black: Sports

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  • Aperture: ƒ/5.6
  • Credit: ShadesOfSepia.com
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 22 June, 2014
  • Focal length: 300mm
  • ISO: 1250
  • Shutter speed: 1/1600s

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  • Aperture: ƒ/5.6
  • Credit: ShadesOfSepia.com
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 22 June, 2014
  • Focal length: 155mm
  • ISO: 1250
  • Shutter speed: 1/1600s

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  • Aperture: ƒ/5.6
  • Credit: ShadesOfSepia.com
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 22 June, 2014
  • Focal length: 300mm
  • ISO: 1250
  • Shutter speed: 1/1600s

Black | Vintage Reproduction: People

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This is my most favorite picture from my trip @ the Gantry. I could immediately sense so much love they have for each other; which makes this photo all the more beautiful. I wish them a long lasting relationship.

  • Aperture: ƒ/20
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 12 July, 2014
  • Focal length: 55mm
  • ISO: 1000
  • Shutter speed: 1/6s

Black: People

Central Park 72nd Street NY

  • Aperture: ƒ/10
  • Credit: Shades Of Sepia
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 25 October, 2014
  • Focal length: 35mm
  • ISO: 100
  • Shutter speed: 1/80s
  • Title: Central Park 72nd Street NY

Van Cortlandt House Museum

  • Aperture: ƒ/5.6
  • Credit: ShadesOfSepia.com
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 3 September, 2014
  • Exposure bias: +5EV
  • Focal length: 300mm
  • ISO: 100
  • Shutter speed: 1/100s
  • Title: Van Cortlandt House Museum

Chinatown

  • Aperture: ƒ/4.8
  • Credit: Yogi
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 9 August, 2014
  • Focal length: 150mm
  • ISO: 400
  • Shutter speed: 1/250s
  • Title: Chinatown

Bronx Walk

  • Aperture: ƒ/5.6
  • Credit: Yogi
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 20 July, 2014
  • Exposure bias: +1EV
  • Focal length: 220mm
  • ISO: 1000
  • Shutter speed: 1/2500s
  • Title: Bronx Walk

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  • Aperture: ƒ/13
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 12 July, 2014
  • Focal length: 300mm
  • ISO: 1000
  • Shutter speed: 1/250s

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  • Aperture: ƒ/13
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 12 July, 2014
  • Focal length: 300mm
  • ISO: 400
  • Shutter speed: 1/200s

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  • Aperture: ƒ/8
  • Credit: ShadesOfSepia.com
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 22 June, 2014
  • Focal length: 195mm
  • ISO: 250
  • Shutter speed: 1/1250s

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  • Aperture: ƒ/8
  • Credit: ShadesOfSepia.com
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 22 June, 2014
  • Focal length: 300mm
  • ISO: 500
  • Shutter speed: 1/1250s

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  • Aperture: ƒ/10
  • Credit: ShadesOfSepia.com
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 22 June, 2014
  • Focal length: 200mm
  • ISO: 1250
  • Shutter speed: 1/250s

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  • Aperture: ƒ/10
  • Credit: ShadesOfSepia.com
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 22 June, 2014
  • Focal length: 200mm
  • ISO: 1250
  • Shutter speed: 1/250s

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  • Aperture: ƒ/22
  • Credit: ShadesOfSepia.com
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 22 June, 2014
  • Focal length: 200mm
  • ISO: 1250
  • Shutter speed: 1/40s

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  • Aperture: ƒ/5.3
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 8 June, 2014
  • Focal length: 112mm
  • ISO: 800
  • Shutter speed: 1/800s

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  • Aperture: ƒ/5.6
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 8 June, 2014
  • Focal length: 200mm
  • ISO: 800
  • Shutter speed: 1/80s

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  • Aperture: ƒ/5.6
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 8 June, 2014
  • Flash fired: yes
  • Focal length: 170mm
  • ISO: 800
  • Shutter speed: 1/80s

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  • Aperture: ƒ/8
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 8 June, 2014
  • Focal length: 200mm
  • ISO: 800
  • Shutter speed: 1/200s

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  • Aperture: ƒ/5.6
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 8 June, 2014
  • Focal length: 135mm
  • ISO: 800
  • Shutter speed: 1/320s

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  • Aperture: ƒ/5.6
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 8 June, 2014
  • Focal length: 200mm
  • ISO: 800
  • Shutter speed: 1/80s

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  • Aperture: ƒ/5.6
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 8 June, 2014
  • Focal length: 200mm
  • ISO: 800
  • Shutter speed: 1/1600s

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  • Aperture: ƒ/5.6
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 8 June, 2014
  • Focal length: 90mm
  • ISO: 800
  • Shutter speed: 1/1600s

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  • Aperture: ƒ/10
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 8 June, 2014
  • Focal length: 200mm
  • ISO: 800
  • Shutter speed: 1/100s

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  • Aperture: ƒ/5.6
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 8 June, 2014
  • Focal length: 200mm
  • ISO: 800
  • Shutter speed: 1/13s

Black: Streets

Bronx Walk: Morrisania & Claremont Village

  • Aperture: ƒ/1.8
  • Credit: ShadesOfSepia.com
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 21 August, 2014
  • Focal length: 35mm
  • ISO: 400
  • Shutter speed: 1/2500s
  • Title: Bronx Walk: Morrisania & Claremont Village

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  • Aperture: ƒ/10
  • Credit: ShadesOfSepia.com
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 22 June, 2014
  • Focal length: 65mm
  • ISO: 1250
  • Shutter speed: 1/1600s

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  • Aperture: ƒ/5.6
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 8 June, 2014
  • Focal length: 18mm
  • ISO: 800
  • Shutter speed: 1/1600s

Sepia: Vintage Reproduction: Objects & Thāngs

Van Cortlandt House Museum

  • Aperture: ƒ/4.5
  • Credit: ShadesOfSepia.com
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 3 September, 2014
  • Exposure bias: +5EV
  • Focal length: 55mm
  • ISO: 1250
  • Shutter speed: 1/2000s
  • Title: Van Cortlandt House Museum

 

 

 

Bronx Walk

  • Aperture: ƒ/20
  • Credit: Yogi
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 20 July, 2014
  • Exposure bias: +1EV
  • Focal length: 300mm
  • ISO: 1000
  • Shutter speed: 1/200s
  • Title: Bronx Walk

Sepia: Objects & Thāngs

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  • Aperture: ƒ/1.8
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 26 July, 2014
  • Focal length: 35mm
  • ISO: 400
  • Shutter speed: 1/640s

Bronx Walk

  • Aperture: ƒ/20
  • Credit: Yogi
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 20 July, 2014
  • Exposure bias: +1EV
  • Focal length: 58mm
  • ISO: 1000
  • Shutter speed: 1/250s
  • Title: Bronx Walk

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  • Aperture: ƒ/5.6
  • Credit: ShadesOfSepia.com
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 22 June, 2014
  • Focal length: 116mm
  • ISO: 1250
  • Shutter speed: 1/800s

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  • Aperture: ƒ/8
  • Credit: ShadesOfSepia.com
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 22 June, 2014
  • Focal length: 280mm
  • ISO: 1000
  • Shutter speed: 1/500s

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  • Aperture: ƒ/7.1
  • Credit: ShadesOfSepia.com
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 22 June, 2014
  • Focal length: 22mm
  • ISO: 1250
  • Shutter speed: 1/250s

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  • Aperture: ƒ/16
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 14 June, 2014
  • Flash fired: yes
  • Focal length: 200mm
  • ISO: 800
  • Shutter speed: 1/4s
I want to use this particular photo as an example, to illustrate why people like me  prefer to only work with RAW files. Please compare with this photo. I took about 4 of these, but this first one did not have a good exposure, it came out very dark and barely visible. I always shoot both RAW+JPEG, cause it's nice having those backups just in case. Long story short, You will quickly noticed how I was able to adjust the brightness coming from the window, the glass is now visible. I also give it a Sepia tint, and made several other adjustments. I would have never been able to make it look this natural, or make the colors blend the way they do, if I started from a jpeg file, especially a small jpeg file.

I want to use this particular photo as an example, to illustrate why people like me prefer to only work with RAW files. Please compare with this photo. I took about 4 of these, but the first one did not have a good exposure, it came out very dark and barely visible. I always shoot both RAW+JPEG, cause it’s nice having those backups just in case. Long story short, You will quickly noticed how I was able to adjust the brightness coming from the window, the glass design is now more defined, and visible. Notice the flooring is more visible as well. I also give it a Sepia tint, and made several other adjustments. Normally, I would have never been able to make the kind of adjustments I did, and still keep the photo looking this natural; or make the colors blend the way they do, if I started from a jpeg file, especially a small jpeg file. I’m not going to lie, this sh** can be a lot of work depending on what your doing, but its totally worth it. So, the next time someone says, your less than smart for working with RAW, just simply walk away. ‘Cause that should give you an immediate clue, they have no idea what their talking about. Remember, investigate for yourself (hands-on), and always speak from the “I”. Oh, BTW: I used mostly light room and Paintshop.

  • Aperture: ƒ/3.5
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 29 December, 2013
  • Focal length: 18mm
  • ISO: 800
  • Shutter speed: 1/60s

Sepia: A Little Warmth

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  • Aperture: ƒ/7.1
  • Credit: ShadesOfSepia.com
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 22 June, 2014
  • Focal length: 280mm
  • ISO: 1250
  • Shutter speed: 1/160s

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  • Aperture: ƒ/9
  • Credit: ShadesOfSepia.com
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Taken: 22 June, 2014
  • Focal length: 210mm
  • ISO: 1250
  • Shutter speed: 1/125s