Shades Of Sepia

Photographic art & community shared thru photography.

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Black & White Mints

  • Aperture: ƒ/1.8
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Caption: SHOTS FROM HOME
  • Taken: 11 July, 2015
  • Focal length: 35mm
  • ISO: 250
  • Shutter speed: 1/50s
  • Title: SHOTS FROM HOME

Fractal Art: Vortex Of The Mind

It has been quite some time since I’ve created fractal art. I call this “Vortex Of The Mind.” As I was envisioning what I wanted to create, I thought about how the minds of young people vacuums up all kinds of data, in the form of images, movies and sounds. The “Vortex Of The Mind” is a representation of that young mind. However, the left hemisphere that controls logic is stressed because it sees no substance of value to take in. The young brain keeps pulling and pulling, and pulling, until finally it realizes that there is nothing but black space; left alone to create their own thoughts without guidance.

VortexOfTheMind

Cell Phone Photography: Let There Be Light!

One of the biggest complaints that traditional/professional photographers still have today, is that the internet culture (social media specifically); Facebook, Tumblr, etc, has changed not only the meaning of photography, but the perception of photography as well. Having said that, photography as an art form is difficult for a lot of people to grasp, because of the thousands of specific types of imagery they are exposed to daily on many of those social media sites. But then again, my views has started to change over time; because it turns out that more and more photographers are also using these same kinds of social media to promote their work, including Facebook. This is a great thing in my opinion, because now it means that “the art of photography” is not really lost, we just have to do a little bit more digging to find them. The important thing is, remember what I’ve said before; “there is a huge difference between a picture and a photograph.” I picture is just just an image that will quickly be forgotten; but a photograph tells a story and will most likely always be remembered. The most beautiful thing I enjoy about being a photographer, is being able to take beautiful walks and actually see not only the story in this particular shot, but the unique art in the shot. My art. My lens. My process. My unique expression. My unique photography.

LetThereBeLight

  • Aperture: ƒ/2.2
  • Camera: SGH-M919
  • Taken: 22 June, 2015
  • Focal length: 4.2mm
  • ISO: 50
  • Shutter speed: 1/3152s

The Joy Of Being A Photographer

Photography is not only a way to literally freeze a moment in our history; it is also an open window to a world of various philosophies through each photographer’s eyes. It is the perfect medium in which to create amazing visual art. Combining photography and software gives us limitless power over our artistic creations. But what is art? Art means many things to many people; in fact the meaning of art is a philosophy on to itself. Just like politics, if you asked a hundred people what is art? You’ll get 100 different answers; and more than half of those people will insist they are giving you the right answer. Although, I will not lie, if you want to create “good photographs,” knowing the technical side of photography is very important. However, enjoying what you do should take first priority. If you don’t enjoy what you’re doing, it will show in your photographs. I also think that we should make the distinction between enjoying photographic art, and actually creating photographic art. Just because you enjoy looking at photographic art, doesn’t necessarily mean you now automatically have the “calling” to be a photographer (these are two totally different things). Just be confident in your own photographic abilities; as you learn more about photography, your instincts for knowing when and what to shoot will come.

Proud

  • Aperture: ƒ/2.2
  • Camera: SGH-M919
  • Taken: 5 May, 2015
  • Focal length: 4.2mm
  • ISO: 50
  • Shutter speed: 1/1872s

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Cell Phone Photography: Cornered

From beginning to end, this was such a difficult shot for me. Sometimes I forget what a pain in the ass some of these angles can be. What the hell, this is what I got just before my patience ran out.. LOL
cornered

  • Aperture: ƒ/2.2
  • Camera: SGH-M919
  • Taken: 5 June, 2015
  • Focal length: 4.2mm
  • ISO: 50
  • Shutter speed: 1/826s

Black: 5 In 1 Building

I absolutely love buildings with interesting structures like this. Anyone that says there is no art in NYC, needs to get their head examined.

Interesting

  • Aperture: ƒ/2.2
  • Camera: SGH-M919
  • Taken: 1 June, 2015
  • Focal length: 4.2mm
  • ISO: 50
  • Shutter speed: 1/372s

Framing That Perfect Shot

Depending on your purpose, you can pretty much take photographs with ANY device today. It can be either a “point and shoot,” DSLR (mirror or mirrorless), iPad, a simple camera phone. These devices take photographs in various degrees of quality, so it is important to understand your equipment, and know which of these devices is practical (or acceptable) for what you’re trying to do. Yet, at the same time, a real photographer will also tell you that it’s not about the gear, but the photographer him/herself. Not just his/her photographic eye, but also skill; on the camera, on the computer, and with his/her vision. Neither of these things can be out of sync. I don’t care how much software skills you have; if you don’t have a vision for YOUR art, then you won’t be able to see with your camera; and then be able to enhance (or create art) what you saw using your software. Taking a “good photograph” doesn’t mean the photographer has to sharply stop objects in motion; this isn’t the meaning of photographic art. Photography means “to draw with light,” and like any other type of drawing, you tell a story with that drawing. Making great photographs takes time to develop. Each one of us finds our inner photographer at different stages in our lives. Once we find that inner photographer, we can then build on it as time goes on. If a photographer still thinks that spending thousands of dollars on a camera (only to stay on automatic mode) is what’s going to give them perfect pictures every single time; I’d say that is a pretty insecure photographer (or lazy) about his or her abilities to take photographs. One thing money absolutely cannot buy, is an innate ability to create photographic art.

So many people who don’t understand photography, think that they can just purchase a “good camera,” and make 6 digit figures a week. This is absolutely not true at all! Which is one of the reasons most REAL photographers have to supplement their income by doing multiple jobs. Despite what many of you may falsely imagine, photographers don’t make thousands of dollars of random pictures of people on the internet (this is not the meaning of what it is to be a photographer). So please, don’t get your panties in a bunch! If it were true that every photographer can potentially make a 6 figures, almost every single person on the planet would be a photographer by profession. Not only that, the world would be terribly imbalanced. People take for granted how difficult street photography is. Often times there are many obstacles that come in to a frame that is uncontrollable. Sometimes you can quickly improvise, sometimes you can’t. Sometimes you have to let it go, sometimes you get a second chance. But one thing is for sure about street photography, if you don’t take a chance and shoot, you may never get another opportunity to shoot that same shot again. However, this is also in the fun of being a street photographer; “the chase for that special photograph that becomes a piece of our archived history.”

©  ShadesOfSepia.com

Shades Of Black: Just Chillin’

I Know You Got Soul

  • Aperture: ƒ/10
  • Credit: ShadesOfSepia.com
  • Camera: NIKON D5200
  • Caption: I Know You Got Soul
  • Taken: 13 September, 2014
  • Exposure bias: +5EV
  • Focal length: 35mm
  • ISO: 400
  • Shutter speed: 1/125s
  • Title: I Know You Got Soul
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